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Welder/Cutter

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AVG. SALARY

$57,320

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EDUCATION

High school preferred +

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JOB OUTLOOK

Stable

Real-Life Activities

Real-Life Communication

You've been asked to weld a cracked loading bucket for Lloyd's tractor. You tell Lloyd that you're going to use an arc weld to repair the fracture.

"I'll probably use a STICK instead of a TIG weld," you say, explaining the type of arc weld you are going to use. He looks confused. "Well, I could use a MIG weld if that's what you want," you say.

"What's the difference?" he asks.

Here's your answer:

There are three types of arc welds: STICK, MIG and TIG.

STICK: welding using a flux

MIG: welding using argon gas as a shield

TIG: welding using a non-consumable tungsten electrode

Lloyd still looks confused. Using the definitions below, create an explanation for the three different kinds of welds. Remember to explain all the words within each definition such as flux, shield and electrode.

Here are the other definitions you'll need:

Arc: An electrical current is being used to produce heat for the weld. In each process it's necessary to have an electrode for the electric arc to flow from the electrical source to the piece being welded.

Electrode: A conductor that allows a hot, electric arc to flow from the electrical source to the piece being welded. The electrode is often a filler rod.

Flux: Something that is used to coat or cover the weld to prevent air from mixing with it while it is still molten.

MIG: In this process, a thin wire that comes off a spool is used as the electrode and is consumed and deposited during the welding operation.

Shield: This is similar to a flux except that argon gas is used to cover the weld to prevent air from mixing with the metal while it is still molten.

STICK: In this process, the flux melts over the weld as the electrode is consumed and deposited during the welding operation.

TIG: In this process, the filler is a plain piece of metal added drop by drop to the weld.

(Non-Consumable) Tungsten Electrode: The electrode (made out of tungsten) that is conducting the electrical charge isn't melted and deposited on the weld. An outside filler metal is used for the weld.

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